Recharging Egg Health for Women Trying to Conceive; the role of CoEnzyme Q10

One challenge to diagnosing and managing fertility problems is our inability to estimate the healthfulness of any woman’s eggs. We know that as women age; egg quality declines. But that doesn’t really help us know the viability of the eggs that someone has now. Even more bothersome is nobody fully understands the physiology of immature eggs—the ones not yet fertilized. But we do know that they require a lot of energy.

CoQ10

CoEnzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential aspect of the part of the egg that generates power (mitochondria). This enzyme helps our cells convert carbohydrates and fats into energy. It also helps protect our cells from the enzymes that cause them to breakdown—something that most of any woman’s eggs are destined to do. CoQ10 is also a potent anti-oxidant that can help protect the DNA in the egg from damage. These are three vital functions.

 

Although your body makes most of the CoQ10 you need; we do get some from our diet as well. The richest dietary sources are meat, chicken and fish as well as soybeans, canola oil and nuts. Unfortunately there is no easy way to measure which women have adequate CoQ10 and those that would benefit from more. There is no simple test. However, a recent study did provide some insights into the potential benefit of CoQ10 supplementation for fertility patients going through treatment.

 

A prospective, randomized study followed 186 women that were considered to have a reduced chance of achieving a successful pregnancy through IVF due to them being classified as having a decreased ovarian reserve. Half were placed on CoQ10 supplements beginning about 60 days before their egg retrieval. They found that the women placed on CoQ10 had a higher number of eggs retrieved, a higher fertilization rate and produced better quality embryos. Another randomized study found improved ovarian response and higher pregnancy rates in women with PCOS given a smaller dose of CoQ10 during ovulation induction treatment.

 

So if you’re trying to conceive, consider whether or not you may benefit from this important supplement. This may be especially important if you’re older than 35 years of age, have a low ovarian reserve, history of previous treatment failure or have PCOS. If you’re looking for a reliable brand of this supplement, here’s the one that I typically recommend to my patients: https://theralogix.com/products/neoq10-coenzyme-q10-supplement

 

Stay healthy,

~Robert

Robert Greene, MD, FACOG

Conceptions Reproductive Associates of Colorado

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