Links to Useful Resources

One of the books, Dr. Greene has written: Perfect Hormone Balance for Fertility

PHB-Fertility

 

 

 

What are my chances with ART: Calculate your per cycle pregnancy rate based upon your unique history.

 



Clean Cosmetics Database
: An online online safety guide for cosmetics and personal care products created by the Environmental Working Group.



Breast Cancer Fund
: This features breaking news and opinion about science, public policy advances, consumer, special events, and Breast Cancer Fund Supporters.



Center for Science in the Public Interest
: Provides articles on current issues in nutrition, food safety, and health.



Turner Syndrome Society
: Turner Syndrome Society is an organization that focuses on creating awareness, promoting research, and providing support for individuals affected by the Turner Syndrome.



The Endometriosis Association
: The Endometriosis Association is a recognized authority on endometriosis, a life-altering hormone and immune system disease.



PCOSupport
: PCOSupport is an all-volunteer grass-roots organization that is operated by women with PCOS (Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome) and those who support them.



The Environmental Working Group
: The mission of the Environmental Working Group (EWG) is to use the power of public information to protect public health and the environment. EWG is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization, founded in 1993 by Ken Cook and Richard Wiles.



The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics
: The Campaign for Safe Cosmetics is a national coalition of nonprofit health and environmental organizations. Their goal is to protect the health of consumers and workers by requiring the personal care products industry to phase out the use of chemicals linked to cancer, birth defects and other serious health concerns, and replace them with safer alternatives.

16 thoughts on “Links to Useful Resources

  1. Hi Dr. Greene,

    I was reading through the SIRM forums the other day and came across one of your posts where you said you don’t use LH on older or perimenopausal women for IVF cycles. As an apparently perimenopausal woman of 38 who had 2 IVF cycles cancelled due to nonresponse, I find this very interesting since I was put on both Luveris and Menopur (having an even poorer response to the Menopur than I did to the Luveris) and am wondering if you could write something about it on your blog. I belong to forums ivf.ca and know a lot of women would find that article very helpful. I can’t find the exact post anymore and want to give the correct info to my fellow IVFers.

    Thanks so much.

    Denise

    1. Dear Denise,
      Thank you for the suggestion for a future blog post. Life has been a bit chaotic lately as we’ve had a rather busy February IVF cycle. I am now working on the next blog post about the impact of LH upon egg quality. Please check back for this upcoming entry and alert your forum members at ivf.ca.

      Best thoughts,
      ~Robert

    2. Thank you for your patience. I have posted a new blog entry today that addresses how and why specific medications/hormones used during fertility treatment can improve or compromise egg quality. I hope you find that this clarifies this for you. Please share it with the group your referenced in your previous post.
      Best thougths,
      ~Robert

  2. Good morning Dr Green,

    I am 40 years old, living in Spain and I bought recently your book “Perfect Hormone Balance for Fertility”, which generated a very high interest in my quest to get pregnant. I have already had 3 IVF cycles since April 2010. The first IVF cycle gave a result of 7 ovocytes and then 4 embryons, which were declared abnormals by genetical analysis. The process stopped and there was no embryons transfered. The 2nd IVF cycle stopped with the vitrification of 4 mature ovocytes. During the third IVF cycle, which ended today, 5 mature ovocytes were added to the previous 4 vitrificated. We got then 9 embryons, 4 of which saw their development blocked and 5 were seen as elegible for biopsis and genetical analysis. Amongst the 5 remaining embryons, 4 were declared abnormal and 1 was declared normal. This last one was theoretically elegible for embryon transfer, but it blocked his development after the biopsis. As such, it was lost also and there was no transfer. At my age (40), this type of situation can occur, of course, but my deception is high and I would like to give myself the best chances in order to get pregnant in a near future, at least to have done all the possible in order to give me the best chances. What would be your advices to maximize my chances of success? What would be on one hand your specific advice in order to keep my FSH as low as possible (now, level of 12) or eventually lower it? On the other hand what would be your specific advice to improve my genetical diagnostic (increase my egg´s quality)? Would you have eventually some links with some practicians in Spain (Madrid) who are sharing your approach regarding the hormone balance and the fertility? I would like to talk with you directly, but I do not have your phone number to do so. Anyway, if you want to call me, my mobile phone number is +34 679 45 17 89. I thank you already very much for your answer! Maria Jesus Soriano Palomo, Madrid

    1. Dear Ms. Palomo,
      I am so sorry to learn of all that you’ve been through and yet not achieved a successful pregnancy. These are very complicated questions and they would be far more successfully discussed rather than having me try to write answers in this format. If you’d like to set up a consultation, that would allow me to review your medical history more fully and discuss possible treatment modifications more directly then I’d encourage you to call my office at 916.568.2125. I regret that I don’t know any physicians in Spain that I can refer you to but I can tell you that we’ve taken care of couples this year that have traveled to us from Spain, Germany, France and various parts of the USA. Whatever you decide, I do wish the very best outcome as soon as possible.
      Best thoughts,
      ~Robert

      Robert Greene, MD, FACOG
      Medical Director
      SIRM–Northern California

  3. Hi Dr. Greene
    I have read your blogs related to egg quality and factors which can improve it. Iam 32 years old with low AMH . I am planning to go for ivf cycle through you. where can i contact you?

    1. Dear riki,
      Thank you for your interest in my opinion and the opportunity to assist you in your quest to conceive. I am in the process of relocating to a center that is offering a very comprehensive approach to the diagnosis and management of fertility problems. Please check back with me in a couple of weeks so that I can provide you with details.

      Best thoughts,
      ~Robert

      Robert Greene, MD, FACOG

    1. Dear riki,
      Thank you for your interest. I am in the process of joining Dr. Rob Kiltz at CNY Fertility in Syracuse, NY. Please check out our website to learn more about the holistic approach to fertility care that we offer: http://cnyfertility.com . Better still, you may be shocked at how reasonably priced the treatment options are. The goal is to make more options available and affordable to people seeking treatment. I welcome your feed back and hope that you like what you see.

      Best thoughts,
      ~Robert

      Robert Greene, MD, FACOG

  4. Dr. Greene,

    My REI specialist at Yale recently diagnosed me with early premature ovarian failure. I have a low AMH, low progesterone, and spotting around day 20 of my 22 day cycles. Ultrasound showed normal ovarian size and normal number of follicles for my age – age 33. An adrenal hormone test also showed I have low 17 hydroxyprogesterone. Could my low AMH be due to the low adrenal hormone? Is there any chance I just need help with the adrenal fatigue, supplement with progesterone, and that I’m actually not experiencing decreased ovarian reserve?
    Thank you!
    Rachel

    1. Dear Rachel,
      There are many factors that can contribute to premature ovarian failure (POF). Fortunately, I can reassure you that having a low adrenal hormone is not one of them. In fact, there is no recognized diagnosis of “adrenal fatigue” by either the medical endocrionlogists nor the reproductive endocrinologists. Here is a link to an more detailed explanation that you may find helpful: http://www.hormone.org/Public/upload/Adrenal-Fatigue-Web.pdf . Please let me know if I may be of further assistance to you.

      Best thoughts,
      ~Robert

      Robert Greene, MD, FACOG
      CNY Fertility Center

  5. Hello Dr. Green:
    In reading the above discussion, I am curious about the significance of Anti-mullerian hormone. How significant is an abnormal result in indicating true POF?
    Thanks

    1. Trisha,
      I believe that one of the values of AMH is helping patients choose their treatment modality as well as optimizing their chance of completing their family. For instance, if a woman has a lower AMH then anticipated, she may choose to move more quickly to IVF or even consider moving on to an egg donor. Similarly, if someone’s goal is to have more than one pregnancy, AMH might sometimes suggest that someone consider “embryo banking” (creating embryos for freezing with the goal of having them for later use). Does this make sense?
      Best thoughts,
      ~Robert

      Robert Greene, MD, FACOG

  6. Robert,
    Thank you – that makes sense. So what about my low 17 hydroxyprogesterone and low morning cortisol? I understand that POF can be due to decreased ovarian reserve or hormonal insufficiencies. My AMH is 0.16 and 0.2 (tested twice). Could this low AMH be reversed? Is it definitive? Can it be that i just have hormonal insufficiencies that can be treated rather than decreased egg number?
    Thank you,
    Rachel

    1. Hello Rachel,
      Cortisol levels can vary day-to-day depending on a variety of factors; most notably how someone slept and whether or not they are feeling stressed. Thus far, there is no proven way to reverse a diminished AMH. Typically, they do not vary much and rarely will they increase but I have seen it occur. Unfortunately, that’s why we currently treat a low AMH as condition where a woman’s egg number is lower than anticipated. Hope that this helps clarify.
      Best thoughts,
      ~Robert

      Robert Greene, MD, FACOG
      CNY Fertility Centers

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s