Recharging Egg Health for Women Trying to Conceive; the role of CoEnzyme Q10

One challenge to diagnosing and managing fertility problems is our inability to estimate the healthfulness of any woman’s eggs. We know that as women age; egg quality declines. But that doesn’t really help us know the viability of the eggs that someone has now. Even more bothersome is nobody fully understands the physiology of immature eggs—the ones not yet fertilized. But we do know that they require a lot of energy.

CoQ10

CoEnzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an essential aspect of the part of the egg that generates power (mitochondria). This enzyme helps our cells convert carbohydrates and fats into energy. It also helps protect our cells from the enzymes that cause them to breakdown—something that most of any woman’s eggs are destined to do. CoQ10 is also a potent anti-oxidant that can help protect the DNA in the egg from damage. These are three vital functions.

 

Although your body makes most of the CoQ10 you need; we do get some from our diet as well. The richest dietary sources are meat, chicken and fish as well as soybeans, canola oil and nuts. Unfortunately there is no easy way to measure which women have adequate CoQ10 and those that would benefit from more. There is no simple test. However, a recent study did provide some insights into the potential benefit of CoQ10 supplementation for fertility patients going through treatment.

 

A prospective, randomized study followed 186 women that were considered to have a reduced chance of achieving a successful pregnancy through IVF due to them being classified as having a decreased ovarian reserve. Half were placed on CoQ10 supplements beginning about 60 days before their egg retrieval. They found that the women placed on CoQ10 had a higher number of eggs retrieved, a higher fertilization rate and produced better quality embryos. Another randomized study found improved ovarian response and higher pregnancy rates in women with PCOS given a smaller dose of CoQ10 during ovulation induction treatment.

 

So if you’re trying to conceive, consider whether or not you may benefit from this important supplement. This may be especially important if you’re older than 35 years of age, have a low ovarian reserve, history of previous treatment failure or have PCOS. If you’re looking for a reliable brand of this supplement, here’s the one that I typically recommend to my patients: https://theralogix.com/products/neoq10-coenzyme-q10-supplement

 

Stay healthy,

~Robert

Robert Greene, MD, FACOG

Conceptions Reproductive Associates of Colorado

Having challenges getting pregnant? Laughter can help!

Most of us are goal oriented. As a result, any obstacle that interferes with us achieving an important result produces changes in our physiology that are referred to as “stress.” Sometimes stress can be a positive response. It can help us think creatively, remember details better and provide motivation to try harder. Unfortunately, the stress associated with trying to conceive is not helpful.

Whether trying to become pregnant naturally or with medical assistance; we work with our patients to help reduce the physiologic obstacles created by stress. One of the simplest ways to help reduce stress is to smile. Even when smiles are artificially induced; they can reduce the physiologic impact of stress. But we encourage people to go even further.

Baby Laughing

As a scientist and clinician, I love having data to further support recommendations. Research on how your body responds to laughter has shown improved immune function. In fact, that data focused in on a specific type of immune cell (NK cell) that we know impacts implantation and early pregnancy. But the best data comes from testing the hypothesis in real world situations like what has been done on patients going through IVF.

One well-designed interventional study followed 220 couples going through IVF. They had half of them randomly assigned to meet with a comedian around the time of their transfer to promote laughter. They found that the pregnancy rate in those exposed to laughter were almost double! Although this study has not (yet) been repeated; the results do make sense. We’ve all experienced serious situations where we have laughed—sometimes even apologizing for our laughter—only to feel better afterwards.

So as you proceed, consider the following advice: “Laugh often and smile loudly”

Mirthfully yours,

~Robert

 

Robert Greene, MD, FACOG

Conceptions Reproductive Associates of Colorado

Metformin Reduces Miscarriage Risk

I have written previous blog posts about the various ways that metformin can improve fertility treatment. These studies typically focus on the influence that this medication seems to have on becoming pregnant. We now have compelling evidence that this medication can also optimize your chance of completing your pregnancy. In other words, metformin is associated with a reduction in the risk of miscarriage.

Mid Pregnancy Yoga

Most miscarriages occur in the first trimester. It is estimated that 80% of pregnancy losses occur within the first 6 to 12 weeks of pregnancy. Previous research has shown that use of metformin may help reduce this risk due to various ways that it seems to influence egg quality and by stabilizing first trimester hormone shifts. Now a study has found that continuing metformin reduces the risk of later miscarriage by 50%!

 

A very well designed study followed nearly 500 women in 14 difference centers as their pregnancies progressed. These women had been randomly assigned to take metformin based upon a previous diagnosis of risk due to either PCOS or concerns of potential gestational diabetes. Unfortunately, 10% of women taking the placebo lost their pregnancy after the first trimester. But the women taking metformin had less than half as many pregnancy losses! Since no other treatment has demonstrated a comparable ability to reduce the risk of second trimester loss—these results are pretty impressive.

 

So if you feel that you may be at risk of second trimester pregnancy loss or gestational diabetes; discuss with your provider whether or not you may be a candidate for metformin.

Stay informed,

Robert Greene, MD, FACOG

Conceptions Reproductive Associates

Boxers vs. Briefs; another popular myth falls to scientific investigation

There are many common health related beliefs that are popular in our culture today. The field of fertility medicine probably has more than most; for instance check out this excerpt from the popular sitcom Seinfeld. These recommendations are often driven by an idea and maybe even a theory that sounds valid. But rarely are they ever challenged by good investigation. Through time, these suggestions can even become recognized as facts despite the lack of supporting data. This has been the case in how men are advised to help their partner conceive more quickly. “Boxers over briefs” has been the unchallenged advice for underwear for decades…until now.

Boxers v Briefs

The best study to date was recently published in the journal Andrology. They tracked over 500 couples for a year to see if there was a correlation between time to pregnancy, conception delay or infertility in men who wore boxers vs. briefs. They even tracked daytime vs. nighttime habits as well. Although there some changes in sperm counts and other parameters; this did not impact their true goal of having a baby. So it’s best for men to focus on other helpful instructions to optimize their sperm quality and count.

 

Here are few helpful tips:

 

Stay informed,

~Robert

Robert Greene, MD, FACOG

Conceptions Reproductive Associates of Colorado

Women are Having Fewer Children Than They’d Like

recent article in the New York Times caught my attention and I thought it would be worth sharing.

In summary: evidence from the CDC suggests that America’s fertility is in precipitous decline.

What you can do:

  • Be an informed patient. Know your fertility status to help plan your life and family goals.
  • Schedule an appointment with a REI for more information.

Doing an IVF cycle? A Mediterranean diet can help!

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Couples often ask me: “What else can we do to make this IVF cycle successful?” The first answer, is to pick the right lab. I’m fortunate to work with an amazing group of embryologists so I encourage my patients to consider the next step: using your diet and lifestyle to stack the odds in your favor. As we have discussed before in the blog, what you eat and what you do can absolutely impact your fertility and overall health. New research demonstrates that your diet, in particular, can impact your success with IVF.

 

As many of my patients know, I encourage a plant-based diet to enhance your fertility naturally. The problem with many of these studies that we have previously reviewed is that people who eat a plant-based diet are more likely to be thin and the following question emerges: “Is diet really impacting your fertility or does this have to do with your weight?” A new study helps us address this question.

 

In this study, women who had a normal weight (BMI < 30 kg/m2) underwent IVF in Greece. Women who ate a Mediterranean diet were more likely to get pregnant and bring home a healthy child compared to women who did not eat a Mediterranean diet. Women who ate better were almost 3 times as likely to bring home a child than women who did not eat a Mediterranean diet! The results suggest that dietary modifications may help increase the chances of a successful pregnancy and delivering a live baby for women undergoing IVF treatment.

 

What this study doesn’t answer, however, is when these dietary changes need to be implemented in order to have the full benefits on your fertility. My advice is simple: the sooner the better. The healthier you are when you start an IVF cycle, the more likely you are to get the full benefits of diet on your fertility. However, if you have a time crunch with regards to your fertility, with diagnoses such as diminished ovarian reserve, it may not be in your best interest to delay starting treatment. Talk to your doctor for more information about what the best next steps are for you.

 

Take home points:

  • Your diet can impact your chance of having success with IVF
  • Consider implementing a Mediterranean diet
  • Talk to your doctor for more information to help select the best diet for your goals