Selective dietary supplementation in early postpartum is associated with high resilience against depressed mood

Much of modern psychiatry is about using medications to try to normalize brain chemistry as a tool to help resolve mood disorders. Having been involved in considerable research on how hormonal shifts can cause changes in brain chemistry–I am always interested in trying to help my patients understand what may occur and what they may be able to do to take preventive actions. Here is a study that suggests that using a dietary supplement containing tryptophan (2 grams) and tyrosine (10 grams) may prevent postpartum blues without changing breast milk contents. Better still, this might interrupt the spiral to postpartum depression! Check out this link and then talk with your doctor before starting any program.

http://www.pnas.org/content/114/13/3509.abstract

Getting Healthy While Getting Pregnant! Flax Seeds for Hypertension

One of the most important aspects of boosting your chances of becoming pregnant is to optimize blood flow to your pelvis–this is true for both men and women! For women, this is even more important since pregnancy can exacerbate blood pressure problems dramatically. Rather than resort to medications, here’s a great nutritional tip. Introduce 30 grams of ground flax seed into your daily diet–that’s about a 1/4 cup. You can add this to salads, soups, cereals, smoothies or just about anything. Studies now show that this simple intervention can reduce your blood pressure more effectively than many of the popular–and much more expensive–medications. For those of us that love the science and want to see the proof, watch this brief video with links to the supporting studies:  http://nutritionfacts.org/video/flax-seeds-for-hypertension/

 

Resveratrol (supplement from red wine) could reduce the hormonal effects of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Here’s another fascinating study for women with PCOS; 1500 mg of the potent antioxidant from red wine can reduce testosterone levels by nearly 25%. This can not only improve egg quality and pregnancy rates but also reduce other symptoms of PCOS as well!

http://press.endocrine.org/doi/10.1210/jc.2016-1858

Iodine Supplements Before, During, and After Pregnancy; critical problem with a simple solution

The problem of iodine insufficiency during pregnancy has troubled me for years. So much so that I spoke at length about this in pregnancy book that I wrote as well as the fertility book. Now there is a very brief video made by Dr. Michael Greger that explains this problem more articulately than I ever did with simple recommendations—check your prenatal vitamin! Only about half contain this nutrient that is so important for your baby to build a healthy brain.     http://nutritionfacts.org/video/iodine-supplements-before-during-and-after-pregnancy/?utm_source=NutritionFacts.org&utm_campaign=94b0f568b9-RSS_VIDEO_WEEKLY&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_40f9e497d1-94b0f568b9-23307533

Coffee and Uterine Blood Flow | NutritionFacts.org

Coffee has remained a matter of debate and controversy for some time in the fertility world. Initially it was thought to promote miscarriages and reduce uterine blood flow. Newer data is suggesting that it can reduce the risk of diabetes and may actually promote arterial blood flow. Until more information is obtained or you have been specifically advised by your provider to abstain from coffee; practice moderation or consider tea! Here’s a great video to bolster your confidence.   http://nutritionfacts.org/video/coffee-and-artery-function/

Early Pregnancy Loss; simple changes to reduce your risk

 

One of the most challenging problems to diagnose and treat for couples trying to conceive is the problem of recurrent early pregnancy loss (REPL). As fertility specialists, we spend a tremendous amount of time and energy making sure that we control all of the variables that might improve the chances that a pregnancy gets a healthy start. New evidence shows that women can—and should—make some simple changes in their lifestyle to also improve their chances for a successful outcome.

 

A study presented at the 2015 meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine recently highlighted the potential impact of a chemical called phthalates on the pregnancies of women going through IVF. This was part of a study called the EARTH study; an investigation on how environmental and lifestyle can impact reproductive health. They measured phthalate levels in the urine of about 250 women going through fertility treatment and then followed these levels in nearly 300 pregnancies. What they found was that women going through fertility treatment that had higher levels of this chemical in their body had a much higher chance of miscarrying then the fertility patients with lower levels. In fact, their risk could be as much as three to four times higher—depending upon their level of exposure.

 

An important aspect of modern research is to pose the question of “why?” In this case, the question would be “why would phthalates increase the risk of miscarriage.” The answer to that question is by interfering with the ability of ovary to support the development of the early pregnancy. Specifically, after an egg is released from the ovary; the cells that remain at the site of the egg’s origin form a hormone producing unit called a corpus luteum (CL). The function of this CL is to help get the pregnancy off to a strong start until the placenta is large enough to take over hormone production. In 2014 a well designed study found that phthalates directly interfere with the ability of the CL to perform this critical role.

 

A recent multi-centered clinical study found that women pursuing Advanced Reproductive Treatments (ART) like IVF had lower levels of phthalate in their body than infertility patients pursuing other forms of treatment. The believed explanation for this finding was that patients undergoing IVF may pursue healthier lifestyle choices. For instance, it is estimated that at least 90% of the phthalates in our bodies are due to dietary intake. By reducing processed foods and decreasing consumption of animal fats, phthalate levels fall rapidly. In fact, our bodies are able to eliminate phthalates after only 6 to 12 hours. So it is only through the continued exposure that these chemicals persist in the bloodstream. So by making better choices, patients may be able to reduce their risk of miscarriage by 75%.

 

Here are some easy steps that you can take to begin reducing your phthalate level today:

  • Only use nail polishes that are phthalate free—most add a phthalate called DBP to reduce chipping
  • Don’t microwave or cook your food in plastic containers or use plastic utensils to eat hot foods—heat leaches this chemical out of the plastics and into food—the easiest pathway into your body
  • Avoid plastic bottles—seek out glass or metal instead. When you must use plastic seek out bottles with the #2, #4 and #5 in the recycle triangle
  • Avoid perfumes and scented products—phthalates (DEP) are used to prolong fragrances
  • Don’t use air fresheners—most contain phthalates
  • Avoid vinyl containing products—many products like lawn furniture, rain coats or shower curtains can not only release phthalates that can be inhaled but they can also be absorbed through the skin as well.

Is there any benefit to the use of organic products?

 

Studies show that during the average pregnancy in the US, women will consume between 12 and 14 lbs of food additives. This will include more than 4,500 different flavorings, additives, preservatives, pesticides and herbicides that are deliberately added to what they’re consuming. Although we have regulatory agencies that are supposed to insure the safety of what we are exposed to in our diet, most of these have been placed in a category of “generally recognized as safe” or GRAS. As this blog and my books reveal, there is growing data demonstrating how unsafe many of these hormone-disrupting chemicals can be. More surprising to me is that while it is assumed that these chemicals are safe until studies show otherwise; many people demand proof that organic products offer an advantage. On this too, the data is becoming increasingly clear.

In March of 2008, a comprehensive review of the published research comparing the nutritional content of organic foods to those produced through conventional farming techniques. This paper included 97 research studies that compared the nutrient content of 236 paired items. The organic foods were superior in 145 (61%) of the comparisons; while the conventionally farmed foods were superior in 87 (37%). In 2% there was no difference. Specifically, the organically grown foods tend to be higher in vitamins, minerals and anti-oxidant content whereas the conventionally grown foods tended to be higher in protein, nitrogen and sugar content. This means that the organic foods are healthier while the others are more calorie-dense. By switching to organic products you can reduce your exposure to hormone disrupting chemicals by about 90% while supporting beneficial practices for the environment.

Over the past several years, the purchase of organic products has gone up by over 30%. As a result, their cost has come down and their availability has increased. That doesn’t mean that it doesn’t cost a bit more. Here are some steps that you can take if you’re on a more limited budget:

  • Consider re-directing some of the money that you spend on vitamins/supplements toward organic food purchases. There is less of a need to “supplement” a healthy diet.
  • Be selectively organic. Some foods are more prone to contamination from conventional farming than others. Here are the foods that you simply can’t clean away the toxins from: apples, cherries, peaches, raspberries, bell peppers, grapes, pears, spinach, celery, nectarines, potatoes and strawberries.
  • Pay attention to your method of cooking. If you’re grilling at high temperatures, deep-frying in oils or micro-waving your food in plastics then you’re introducing all sorts of toxins that aren’t necessary.
  • Reduce your consumption of animal products. Many of the toxins that animals are exposed to are stored in their fats. By consuming meat, fish or poultry you’re getting a concentrated dose of what that animal was exposed to during its life. By lowering your portion size and choosing leaner options you’re be reducing your chemical burden.